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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 7,410 (some duplicates have been removed)
the constitution to promote their own political agendas in theodore and woodrow, how two american presidents historic constitutional freedoms >> no more from america -- book tv college series. this interview was recorded at the united states naval academy. it's about ten minutes. >> on your screen now, professor of history at the u.s. table academy. author of several books, including his most recent, american sheikhs, to families,j) for generations, and the storyk) of americj)a's influence in then middle east. who was dana? >> the founder of what later became the american university of beirut. >> added he go about doing that? >> a lot of american entrepreneur real spirit. >> made the family quite wealthy. >> what was his goal in founding the american university? >> his initial goal differ from a became his life's work. he arrived in the middle east and 1850's determined to convert muslims to christianity and very quickly realized that wasn't going to happen and that's the way to make a connection was not to convert them, but to educate them and to improve their lives and tangible, concrete w
sign of americans who had escaped from tehran. a happy welcome. at the ceremony, canada and canadians were cheered along with americans. many people including the returnees were wearing olive branches on their lapels. there was concern somebody might say something that would make the aranian jailers angry at the people still held in iran. explaining how the escapees had hid first in the homes of friends then took refuge at the canadian embassy. >> it is hard to express how happy we are, they made us feel as part of our family especially at times during christmas when our spirits really needed the boost. we thank them for their brave support. >> reporter: then he made a plea for the 53 still in prison. >> we must not and will not forget them. >> late this afternoon the six american returnees made a visit with the president. the president was delighted. >> these are six brave americans. that knew that american people loved them but didn't know how much until they got back. >> still to come on a second look the day the hostages were freed just as a new american president was sworn in. >
for the school because of his family connections. >> again, who owns the american university or who runs it is it associated with the religion or another school? >> non-secular and nonsectarian. what does it cost to go? >> i have no idea. i don't know the answer to that question either but i do know over time it began to open the story's not just the offspring of the middle east but regarded none of religion. the class's and religions and that's appeal. it sets its merit. >> how is it viewed in the middle east when i think those were two separate questions. that would provide suspicion on the part of the middle east when the school opened in the late 1860's who didn't have deep roots in the region, but rather quickly it became apparent to the middle easterners who were not just orthodox christians, but muslims and jews because this was the best place to get the best possible education and at the generation by 1900 had become what it remains to this day which is part of the middle east and what's magnificent about that is it is an all-inclusive institution founded by serving the interest
we identified three major elements that made up americanism. nevertheless we never provided a definition of american exceptionalism and tearing the revisions over time we corrected that would the next edition we hope will be out next year. in 2004, it seemed a national -- natural progression to move toward a history of the world especially the modern world. it is tumwater and world we see the fullness of american liberty and prosperity on display. and under attack. through an amazon book review of patriot's history of the united states i met david doherty comment an arkansas businessman, historian, computer expert from evening shade. there is an evening shade, arkansas. we began to talk about errors in patriot's history of the united states and over time i discovered he is a wonderful co-author so i asked him to help me with "a patriot's history of the modern world" and. he proved good in areas where i was week. as a former intelligence officer in the army he brought a new perspective to the cold war, especially in the second volume we are working on now. john mentioned this
three major elements that made up americanism. nevertheless, we never really provided a definition of american exceptionalism. and during our revisions over time, we kind of corrected that for the next edition that we hope will be out next year. even in 2004 it seemed a natural progression to move toward a history of the world, especially the modern world. it's the modern world that we see the true fullness of american liberty and prosperity on display. and under attack. through an amazon book review of "patriot's history of the united states," i met dave doherty, an arkansas businessman, historian, computer expert from evening shade. yes, there is an evening said, arkansas. we first began a top to bottom errors remain anything "a patriot's history of the united states," and then over time i discovered he's a wonderful co-author, so i asked him to help me with "patriot's history of the modern world." as a former intelligence officer in the army, he brought a new perspective to the cold war, especially in the second volume that we're working on now. and, um, as jon mentioned, this i
. celebrating, acknowledging, the first asian americans. we have the first asian-american actress in hollywood. the first asian-american nba player. the first members of congress. these interns are the future of our community. they are the reason why we are here today. we're also here to celebrate and recognize one of the greatest members of our community. this year it is the first year we are giving the lifetime achievement award. the lifetime achievement award this year is going to secretary norman manetta. he is a trailblazer. a man who paved the way for many of us. he was the first asian-american mayor of a major city. he was elected to congress 10 times. he was the first person to serve two presidents in a cabinet. first as secretary of commerce to president clinton, secretary of transportation to president bush. it was on 9/11 that secretary mineta showed us what he was made of. he made the call to ground all of the planes. it was secretary mineta who instituted the policy is -- policies at tsa. it was secretary mineta who prevented the profiling of arab- americans and muslim americans i
amount to the richest of americans. and worth very little to middle class americans. >> within a few weeks after the legislation was passed, we all get a letter that says congress and the president have given you this tax cut. and that's pretty much it for the middle class. but for higher income groups, the further forward you go in time, the bigger and bigger the benefits get. so it was really designed to front-load the relatively modest benefits for the middle class and to back-load the benefits for the wealthy. >> so why? why do the winners get policies that make their winnings even larger? you know, this is not a trivial change. if you say from the mid-'90s to 2007, those top 400 taxpayers, they've seen their tax rates decline so much that it's worth about $46 million for every one -- >> for every -- >> -- of one of those 400 taxpayers so it's -- the numbers are staggering. when you start to look within the top 1%, and look at what government has done to help those people out through taxes, through changes in the market, financial deregulation and the like, and through protecting
and nourish our souls. we thank you for the opportunity to gather, to honor four native americans from our community. remember those that are not with us, unable to be here, or traveling. we ask for blessing upon them, their families, their friends. we come before you. we are humbled two leggeds. we give things. honde,honde, the best it could possible me. to the singers, to the dancers, their families. honde, honde to everyone in attendance. ( spiritual chanting). (spiritual chanting). grandfather, creator, once again we come together, and gave praise and honor to you, and if you for the many blessings, and again honde, honde for this day. we say these things in your name. please remain standing as we welcome and present to you the grand entry of our eagle staff and our dancers. here we go. bring em in. carrying the first flag of this nation, of this land, the eagle staff larry harristan. how about a round of applause for larry? thank you larry. bringing in our dancers. (drums). good to see you. our southern and northern dancers. welcome ladies. welcome. followed by our j
tv, nicole eustace examines the effects the war of 1812 had on american politics and patriotism. the author reports at the end of the three year war resulted in the quote era of good feelings marked by defuse partisanship and greater nationalism. it's a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction and thank you to the david library for hosting me. to real it's a real pleasure to be here and to see all of you this afternoon. thank you. the title of my talk this afternoon is love and honor in 1812, patriotism and popular culture in the new united states. on june 19 of 1812, james madison made a public announcement of the first war ever to be declared in the history of the united states. he said quote, i extort all the good people of the united states as they love their country, as the feel wrong that they exert themselves. madisons call made clear that the expectations of showing love of country required giving support. at a moment of national crisis, patriotism was needed. he sought to justify the complex for the population at large and motivate the country to
different asian american groups. we had to have a place where something wonderful had been accomplished. a leadership change, one that we never thought in our lifetimes. by the way, as you know, i never thought in our lifetimes we would see an african-american president of the united states. what a wonderful location, that is something to celebrate. he has been here many times, president obama. the very surprised we had of being able to celebrate the first asian mayor of san francisco. it was not my doing, it was all of the people of san francisco saying it is about time we celebrate. thank you to the people of san [applause] i have a very short message. what did i have felt very strongly in my first elected year, but also during my tenure as interim mayor. we have a great deal of celebrate. we also have a great challenge in front of us. there are so many of our asian american friends, iranian friends, friends from the philippines, friends from our japanese-american community, are chinese-american community, waiting for the opportunity to come together to celebrate our diversity, but al
the core principles of american civil life. i also wish to extend condolences to the community for the recent loss of a great lady and great scholar, ann, and i'd like to acknowledge, henry was a stall ward defender of american national sovereignty. i hope that he would have been pleased in presenting this award to me as pleased as i am in receiving it. i'm going to proceed as follows. first, i'll talk about what i call philadelphia sovereignty. second, i'm going to examine the ideas of the global governance project which challenges philadelphia sovereignty, and third, move from ideas to action, and talk about the activities of the globalists, and then, fourth, examine the significance of the conflict between constitutional government and global govern nans. now, sovereignty is define by most scholars and others as going back to 16 # 48, and that's true to an extent, but when i was working on the book and thinking of writing, coming up with concepts, i realized americans don't think of themselves as west -- americans think of sovereignty in the sense that we, the people of the
to the third annual statewide celebration and recognition of asian-pacific islander american heritage month. this event is hosted by the mayor. i will tell you a little bit more. it is a non-profit, non- partisan. since 2001, our focus has been on educating the public on public policy. and fostering the future leaders from our minority communities to serve at federal, state, and local levels. the mission is to empower patients and pacific islander americans in civic and public affairs to education, active participation, and leadership development. >> civic engagement, leadership development, and community servthe theme of tonight's evens a celebration of the achievements and accomplishments of asian-americans in the state of california and our nation. >> ok'ing. -- ok. i would like to introduce our host for this evening. very well known as the first asian-american mayor in san francisco history. mayor lee championed balancing the budget to keep san francisco safe, solvents, and successful. he reformed city pensions. his focus is on economic development, job creation, and building san franci
, the japanese american internment project, and also we have another exhibition called relocation and resiliency, the japanese american internment in california. and both of those are up on the 6th floor and this is the last week, so if you haven't a chance to see these exhibits yet, we really encourage you to go on up and see them because they will be closing on sunday. we really want to thank community works for bringing the exhibit if they came for me today to the san francisco public library. and here to tell you a little bit more about community works is ruth morgan, so help me welcome ruth morgan. thank you. . >> thank you. i do hope that if you haven't seen the exhibit, you will go up to the skylight gallery and see it. the project actually involved over 225 young people who studied the japanese internment through the personal stories of 15 people who were interned or impacted by the internment. and the exhibition highlights the individual stories of each of the japanese americans who came into the classroom, as well as the rich student responses to these stories. the project really gave
-year-old non-partisan institute well known for its studies of american policy -- american opinion on foreign policy. the wilson center and i personally have many good friends who are part of the chicago council. especially the chairman, lester crown, a dear friend., who will be involved in some activities we're conducting in chicago later this month. and we also recently participated in the panel on the middle east with the council in chicago. and, as i said, we're so pleased that they have come here today. the council's most recent biennial survey which looks at american public opinion on the u.s.'s role in the post-9/11 world will be the launch pad for today's conversation. all on this panel and i were in government on 9/11 which, by the way, occurred on a crisp and clear tuesday, which will be tomorrow's weather so i understand, and the day of the week that is tomorrow. we were in different roles. all of us regardless of our party position or party, struggle to find the right strategies to keep our country safe. looking back on it, we did some things right and some things wrong
of california is the state of golden opportunities, where we have a chinese-american mayor of san francisco. 35 years ago, congress members passed similar resolutions in both house and the senate to formally recognize the first 10 days of may as asian-pacific heritage week. one year later, president jimmy carter signed into law a joint resolution to officially designate the annual celebration. 11 years later, president george bush extended the weeklong celebration to an entire month. you know and i know that our mothers say that every day is asian pacific american day. i want to recognize all of the milestones the api has made in the state of california and in the entire country. the caucus has a record of 42 members in the asian caucus in congress. one of their very first things we want to say is it was a young man who was the first member -- we want to make note of that. the reestablishment of the white house initiative by president obama was another accomplishment. president obama's cabinets has dr. steven chu. the very first asian-american -- as ambassador to the republic of china. we have
. it's going to be to mobilize the american people so that they know it's in their interests. >> reform health care. an ambitious promise. from a candidate who hadn't yet won a single primary. a year later, it topped president obama's to-do list. >> so let there be no doubt, health care reform cannot wait, it must not wait and it will not wait another year. >> many in his inner circle felt he needed to tackle other issue first. like creating jobs and growing the economy. >> you're going to dedicate a minimum year of your presidency. and has real implications on what else can't get done in that year. even when you do that, the chances of success is like 1 out of 1 million. >> he was advised and he knew going in that the politics of it weren't going to be very good. >> the status quo is not working for you. >> but the president believed he could succeed where others before him had failed. >> thank you very much, everybody. god bless you. >> with health care, i think it had to do with the fact, he doesn't want to be just another president, he wants to be a great president. >> the president
devicive split in the community. he is an individual who embraces being japanese american who chooses to refuse deployment on the grounds that it's not constitutional. he is inordinately bright and articulate and a poster boy for being sort of the u.s. soldier but he believes, after talking to soldiers coming back, that it's wrong. it's very similar to my central character, chet. as this went on in contemporary news it fed on where my central character became bolstered. that's what happens when you are writing a play. over a period of 3 1/2, 4 years things happen in your personal life and in the world around you that continue to sort of feed into the play. so the no no boy aspect, i just gave him a speech a couple days ago where he says, because i really want to bring up the issue and make it relevant to contemporary times. he says, doesn't anybody care what happened? they took away our rights. doesn't anybody care? is the constitution just a piece of paper that means nothing that the president can sign another piece of paper and then we lose our citizenship and they can do whatever t
that made up americanism. nevertheless, we never really provided a definition of american exceptionalism and during the revisions over time, we corrected that for the next edition we hope will be out next year. even in 2004, it seemed a natural progression to move towards a history of the world, especially the modern world. it's the modern world we see the truthfulness of american liberty and prosperity on display and under attack. through an amazon book review of "a patriot's history of the modern world" and it did doherty, an arkansas businessman historian computer expert for an evening shade. yes, there's the evening shade arkansas. they first begin a top to bottom review of any errors in the united states and over time i discovered he's a wonderful co-author, so i asked in to help the with "a patriot's history of the modern world." he proved especially good in areas where this week and is a former intelligence officer in the army, he brought a new perspective to the cold war, especially in the second volume we work on now. as john mentioned, this volume one visit to 1945. volume two
elements that made up american. nevertheless we never provided a definition of american exceptionalism and during a revision overtime to correct it up for the next addition we hope to be up next year. even in 2004, it seemed a natural progression to new jersey has toured the world especially the modern world. it's the modern world we see the truthfulness of american liberty impressed. he on display and under attack. during amazon book review of patriot history of the united states had met steve dougherty and arkansas businessman historian computer expert from evening shade. we first became a top to bottom review of sidney p. church history the united states and over time i discovered he's a wonderful co-author, so i asked him to help me with history of the modern world. he proved especially good in areas where it was the tennessee former intelligence officer in the army, he brought a new perspective to the cold war, especially the second volume we are working on now. as john mentioned, this is volume one deficit to 1945 and volume two will be out about this time next year, 1946 to pres
's the haves versus the have-nots. it's the have-it-alls versus the rest of americans. >> and -- >> this is supposed to be a government run by the people and if voices don't matter because we're not wealthy, that's really unacceptable and it's dangerous. >>> welcome. i'm glad we could get together again. and i look forward to your company from week to week -- here and online at billmoyers.com. it's good to be back. we begin with the question that haunts our time -- why in a nation as rich as america, has the economy stopped working for people at-large even as those at the top enjoy massive rewards? the struggle of ordinary people for a decent living, for security, is as old as the republic, but it's taken on a new and urgent edge. instead of shared prosperity, our political system has now produced a winner-take-all economy. >> how much is enough, gordon. >> hollywood saw it coming. >> the richest 1% of this country owns half of our country's wealth -- $5 trillion. one-third of that comes from hard work, two-thirds comes from inheritance. interest on interest accumulati
american soldier to be awarded the medal of honor since the vietnam war. he presented this fall could 2010. this is about half an hour. bac ♪ above bac >> ladies and >> ladies and gentlemen, at the president of the united states, president barack obama and first lady michelle obama. ♪ let us pray. almighty god, we invite your presence as we gather to recognize these extraordinary actions, an american soldier, a patriot, and he wrote. our hearts resonate with the of mercy more than life. what doesemember ance know that we have selfless warriors living among us today. as we remember his actions, it may also rumored that all of our armed forces stan across the world today. may we all recommit ourselves to selfless service for our families and fellow citizens. this inspires renewed unity in our own lands. as to celebrate this day, we recognize his parents. it may we recognize the state return of their loved ones. let us never to give banks more than we do right now, to those to pay the cloris liberty which we enjoy. this we pray in your home in maine. holy name. good afternoon, everybody.
russian character by way of yokohama, for an african american character, for all these different characters? i know you worked with specific actors. did they help at all? what was the process there? . >> absolutely. in terms of the african american characters, i wrote this piece initially for the act core company and i thought it would be a great challenge to actually write a play for the core company and the core company has two african american characters and i had tailored two of the characters for steven anthony jones and gregry wallace. it's interesting that gregory wallace, an african american man, was supposed to play mr. oge, an excentric neisei who likes literature. i thought it would be an interesting thing to do. but after a while we did a reading and we realized as good an actor as gregory is, it was pushing his limits for him to play a japanese american character in the late 40's. >> i imagine him as being much older. >> in the course of writing the play and using various actors, he became younger. this chinese actor is more like a character in his mid to late 30's,
master from colorado. and he spoke about how his troop wanted to have a very special american flag. so they bought one with gold tassels around the outside. they sent it to be flown above the capitol, he said the boys were so proud knowing it was going up and they saw it explode on tv. and he contacted nasa to see if they found any remnant of the flag. nothing. he called for months still nothing. then he was reading an article and they mention t something about a flag. hell called nasa and they said we have a presentation to make to you and your boys. so they came together and they were presented with this container and he said we opened the container and there was our flag in perfect condition. [applause] and then he said that's it on the flag pole next to mr. romney. and i reached over and pulled out the flag and it was as if electricity was running through my arm. because i thought about the people on that mission and thought about the people in our space program that put themselves in harm's way recognizing they are promoting learning, pioneering for us. they give of themselves
about. we as americans recognize we have two paths to choose. we've seen what the last four years gives us and it gives us more government that's inefficient and doesn't work very well. it gives us the possibility of even higher taxes. and there's a lot of reasons i hate higher taxes, the biggest reason is i know where that money goes in that city and it's time to clean it up down there. the last thing we need is higher taxes and regulators. instead of embracing the people that give people opportunity for jobs, they pound on us, they pound on small business people and stunt our growth. but we have another choice here tonight. and that's why there is so many people here tonight. you know it's about that american dream. you know government is not the answer. government is the last resort and not a first resort. and we know we're stronger when we run america from the bottom up. when people have more money in their pocket. when families have more wealth and people get jobs. and the greatest issue in america today is jobs. and the reason is mom and dad are working, the family is stronger t c
i discussion on the impact of the african-american vote in the 2012 election including president obama's victory. this is just under one hour. >> good afternoon. i am president and ceo of the joint senses for political and economic study. this is one of the nation's leading public policy institutions. it is the only one that is focused primarily on issues of concern to african-american and other people of color. i want to welcome you here today to our assessment of the impact of impact of african- american vote in the 2012 election. all this was decisive, it was a close arrest in terms of popular vote and the fact that the margins or closed in quite a few of the critical battleground states. analysts will continue to look at and determine the results. i was struck last night by several things. the fact that the president was able to hold onto his boat totals from 2008, he would be hurt by the fact that the president was able to hold onto his vote totals from 2008 in a number of key battleground areas despite much speculation that he would be hurt by dampened enthusiasm among his
't a lot of study on american site about what happened. i happen happen to elect enough to be working with the kennedy tapes during that period and kennedy was taping insensibly during the courage. so i had this remarkable window. one thing is i want to sort of extend the story of missile crisis to find out what happened, because on the 13th day when khrushchev capitulate there were still missiles in cuba. of tens of thousands of soviet troops in cuba. there were nuclear bombs and still tackler nuclear weapons in cuba. >> host: this is the part americans didn't we know about. >> guest: we will discuss that later, but the point being that khrushchev has said he was remove the missiles but he had lied before. so what happened was there was a deep skepticism amongst kennedy and some of his advisers that perhaps this was just a trick. because perhaps the crisis wasn't over, perhaps this is going to get worse. that's one thing i wanted to sort of expand and to deepen the story of the missile crisis. the second thing is that this is remarkable period in kennedy's presidency. it really is a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 7,410 (some duplicates have been removed)